Collapse of civilisation

Homeowners can play a part in helping reduce carbon emissions – MREF

Thursday, 6 December 2018 – Irish homeowners can now play their part in helping Ireland reduce carbon emissions by availing of the Government’s new grant supports to install Solar PV to generate their own renewable electricity and, in so doing, slash their bought in energy bills.

Following the stark warnings earlier this week from world-renowned broadcaster, David Attenborough, where he stated that the ‘Collapse of civilization and the extinction of much of the natural world is on the horizon’, Pat Smith, Chairman of the Micro Renewable Energy Federation (www.mref.ie), said that it is everyone’s responsibility to take action on climate change now.

Pat Smith said: “We all have a stake in the survival of the planet for future generations and anyone who can help address this mammoth issue has a responsibility to play their part to help reduce carbon emissions. Every 4KWP of Solar PV installed on a home will reduce carbon emissions by 2 tonnes per year. Acting together, homeowners have the capacity to reduce carbon emissions by millions of tonnes per year.”

Mr. Smith said that the Irish business and farming community were taking this issue very seriously and that MREF was confident that, with overdue incentives and encouragement from the Government, they would also play a very significant role in helping the Ireland address climate change.

He said: “Financial payback alone is no longer a credible excuse for businesses not to invest in reducing carbon emissions. Those businesses that show leadership in reducing carbon emissions need to be recognised and well rewarded by Government.”

SEAI Installer List

Solar Electric have applied to be on the approved installer list. We received positive news from them on 25th July. We are expecting SEAI to update the list on the website shortly. We do fully expect to be in a position to carry out grant aided projects.

 

 

 

 

Solarworld to enter insolvency proceedings

If you are in the market for German made solar panels you may heard the news that the German company Solarworld is in difficulties, which is unfortunate for their employees and the wider solar business in Europe. While most solar modules are made in China and other low-cost of labour countries some product, like the Conergy PowerPlus module that we supply, come from Germany, (in the case of Conergy Frankfurt Oder). If you would prefer a German made module for your home or business please get in touch and we can explain about the financial strength of the company behind Conergy PowerPlus and the technical merit of the product range.

 

 

 

 

 

Green thinking at Dublin Port

Dublin Port Company received ISO 50001 Certification in 2016, sealing its commitment to best practice in energy management systems. Solar PV will play its part in meeting the Port’s challenging statutory and regulatory obligations of reduced CO2 emissions and increased energy efficiency by 2020.

The initial installation, commissioned in January 2017, is a 28kw system on the roof of the Maintenance and Services building. It is sized to almost meet the electricity load of the building without running the risk of exceeding it. The project went to tender which Solar Electric won.

Stephen Collier, Maintenance and Services Manager, describes their approach to the project very positively,

“They [Solar Electric] were excellent and the installation ran very smoothly. The communication was good which helps.”

Stephen is an engineer and leads up the Energy Team in Dublin Port. The team is comprised of executives from across functions within the company. The Solar PV panels may be too high to be noticeable but the energy team makes sure that all employees know they are there. Stephen explains

“We include the details of all environmental activities in the staff newsletter and I’ll talk about this to anyone who’ll listen. The energy situation is a huge problem for all of us.”

And he isn’t referring solely to Dublin Port Company. Stephen runs what he describes as a ‘very lean energy home’ with solar thermal panels (heating water) and heat pump. He makes his 70km round trip commute in an electric car which he has proudly owned since 2011. Given that level of personal commitment from one of the main drivers it is no wonder that Dublin Port Company have already made more than 10% energy savings since baseline.

The target of 33% remains some way off but Stephen remains positive that they can reach this by 2020. They have partnered with the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) and meeting the standards of ISO 500001 requires that energy is a central consideration in all design and procurement processes.   

If positive attitude counts in energy efficiency and research shows it does, then Dublin Port Company is well placed to meet its obligations. Solar Electric looks forward to working with Stephen and his colleagues on this and further projects.